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Fly tying season is here

Posted by Steve Galea at

If the amount of orders this little shop has been receiving lately is any indication at all, fly tying season is upon us. I think there is something about the onset of winter and dreams of spring that gets a fly tyer in something akin to panic mode. We look at our fly boxes and we don't see that they are half full. We only see the spaces that could be filled with a fresh batch of flies.  And there is an urge to remedy that sorry state of affairs. We then strategize like the best of generals. We scour...

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Tying the Teeny Nymph

Posted by Steve Galea at

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Another classic for the spring fly box

Posted by Steve Galea at

Here's yet another pheasant tail nymph that I tied today. I'm nearing somewhere around three dozen in the last few days. PT nymphs are a great fly to tie and fish. If I could have one nymph pattern in my fly box, this or the gold-ribbed hare's ear would easily make me happy.  I won't go into the recipe because it's so well documented, but I will say that if you are relatively new at tying, this is a useful and fairly simply pattern to learn. Oh, and it's also an inexpensive one since the materials are pheasant tail, fine copper...

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The Wired Stone

Posted by Steve Galea at

The Wired Stone is a heavy stone fly pattern that's not all that difficult to tie. It is a decent pattern when you need to get a fly down deep quickly. I tied a few of these tonight for the first time in size 8. I crowded the bead a bit but it will fish nicely. The next dozen will be better. The recipe is as follows. Hook: Streamer hook Bead: to match hook size Thread: 6/0 to match the pattern. Tail: Goose biots Abdomen: Wire in one or two shades. Shell back: Bugskin Dubbing: to match fly Legs: Goose...

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Little dries

Posted by Steve Galea at

I tied a dozen of these this morning in size 10s and 12s. Not really sure what I'd call this pattern. It's essentially a nice dry fly that's easy to see on the water, so why don't I call it the Snowflake. My apologies if this pattern has been done before. I just picked materials from those at hand and tied away. It look s buggy enough to me and close enough to a Pale Morning Dun, Light Cahill or a moth I suppose. Basically, what we have here is a good searching pattern. Recipe is: Thread: black 12/0 Wing:...

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