Menu
Cart

Click on titles for full blog posting. — Pheasant tail nymph

Another classic for the spring fly box

Posted by Steve Galea at

Here's yet another pheasant tail nymph that I tied today. I'm nearing somewhere around three dozen in the last few days. PT nymphs are a great fly to tie and fish. If I could have one nymph pattern in my fly box, this or the gold-ribbed hare's ear would easily make me happy.  I won't go into the recipe because it's so well documented, but I will say that if you are relatively new at tying, this is a useful and fairly simply pattern to learn. Oh, and it's also an inexpensive one since the materials are pheasant tail, fine copper...

Read more →

Brookie from the Park

Posted by Steve Galea at

Here's a short video clip showing one of the brook trout I caught in Algonquin Provincial Park this week. They are entering fall colours but are not quite there yet. The season with a few exceptions ends on September 30 around here. This one took a pheasant tail nymph. These fish are made better by a wonderful setting. It's hard to beat a day in Algonquin Park.

Read more →

The Pheasant Tail Nymph

Posted by Steve Galea at

The photo above shows one of the most successful nymph patterns ever created, the pheasant tail nymph.The venerable pattern was developed by English river keeper Frank Sawyer. This is a North American version of it, which has refinements such as legs and a thorax made of peacock herl. The original had a copper wire thorax and no legs. The one pictured above is in size 12 and tied by yours truly. It's not textbook perfect but it will certainly catch fish all day long.  Affectionately known by fly anglers as the PT nymph, these flies are relatively easy to tie and...

Read more →

Algonquin Park fly box, Part 2

Posted by Steve Galea at

  Like the Muddler Minnow, the Hot Spot Pheasant Tail nymph is a fly that can really make things happen in the brook trout waters of Algonquin Park and beyond. Some of my biggest brook trout of last season fell to tiny PT Hot Spot nymphs. Quite a few smallmouth bass and suckers couldn't leave this fly alone either.  It works quite nicely when fished on a short line with enough split shot to get it ticking the bottom of the stream.  It is equally effective when used as a dropper fly in still waters. This  should come as no surprise. After all,...

Read more →

info AT example DOT com